Tag Archive | Award

Emerald Literati Network Awards for Excellence 2014

Every year, Emerald asks the editorial teams of several of its journals to nominate an Outstanding Paper and one or more Highly Commended Papers. This year’s winners have now been announced. These selections form part of the Emerald Literati Network Awards for Excellence 2014. Awarded papers related to supply chain management are, for example, about logistics strategy and logistics integration (authors: Spillan et al.), supplier choice criteria (Voss), ocean shipping (Harrison and Fichtinger) and SME supply chain portfolios (Tokman et al.) [all published in IJLM], sustainability (Winter and Knemeyer), supply chain resilience (Wieland and Wallenburg), supply chain counterproductive work behaviors (Thornton et al.) and supply chain integration (Jin et al.) [IJPDLM], and pre-positioning commodities (Bemley et al.) and services operations management (Heaslip) [JHLSCM]. The winning articles are now freely available until the end of May, 2014. (See also: Emerald Literati Network Awards for Excellence 2013.)

SCM Best Paper Award Winners 2013 (2/2)

Three more leading journals of our field have announced the winners of their best paper awards. First, the Decision Sciences Journal has selected the article Managing Differentiation-Integration Duality in Supply Chain Integration by Terjesen, Patel and Sanders for its Best Paper Award for 2012. Second, the article The Competitive Determinants of a Firm’s Environmental Management Activities: Evidence from US Manufacturing Industries by Hofer, Cantor and Dai has won the Journal of Operations Management Jack Meredith Best Paper Award. Finally, the judges for the 2012 Harold E. Fearon Best Paper Award were evenly split between two articles. Therefore, the Journal of Supply Chain Management has announced two winning articles: Supply Chain-Wide Consequences of Transaction Risks and Their Contractual Solutions: Towards an Extended Transaction Cost Economics Framework by Wever, Wognum, Trienekens and Omta, and Who Owns the Customer? Disentangling Customer Loyalty in Indirect Distribution Channels by Eggert, Henseler and Hollmann. Congratulations to all winners! (part 1/2)

Terjesen, S., Patel, P.C., & Sanders, N.R. (2012). Managing Differentiation-Integration Duality in Supply Chain Integration. Decision Sciences, 43 (2), 303-339 DOI: 10.1111/j.1540-5915.2011.00345.x

Hofer, C., Cantor, D.E., & Dai, J. (2012). The Competitive Determinants of a Firm’s Environmental Management Activities: Evidence from US Manufacturing Industries. Journal of Operations Management, 30 (1–2), 69-84 DOI: 10.1016/j.jom.2011.06.002

Wever, M., Wognum, P.M., Trienekens, J.H., & Omta, S.W.F. (2012). Supply Chain-Wide Consequences of Transaction Risks and Their Contractual Solutions: Towards an Extended Transaction Cost Economics Framework. Journal of Supply Chain Management, 48 (1), 73-91 DOI: 10.1111/j.1745-493X.2011.03253.x

Eggert, A., Henseler, J., & Hollmann, S. (2012). Who Owns the Customer? Disentangling Customer Loyalty in Indirect Distribution Channels. Journal of Supply Chain Management, 48 (2), 75-92 DOI: 10.1111/j.1745-493X.2011.03260.x

SCM Best Paper Award Winners 2013 (1/2)

This year’s CSCMP Annual Global Conference took place in Denver, Colorado. It has become a good tradition that some of the leading journals of our field announce their best paper awards during the CSCMP’s Supply Chain Management Educators’ Conference, the academic part of the CSCMP Conference (see my previous post from Atlanta last year). The best paper published in the International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management is The Impact of Individual Debiasing Efforts on Financial Decision Effectiveness in the Supplier Selection Process by Lutz Kaufmann, Craig R. Carter and Christian Buhrmann. The Bernard J. LaLonde Best Paper Award (best paper published in the Journal of Business Logistics) goes to The Roles of Procedural and Distributive Justice in Logistics Outsourcing Relationships by Adriana Rossiter Hofer, A. Michael Knemeyer and Paul R. Murphy. The quality of these papers has certainly raised the bar for our own manuscripts. Thanks to Christian F. Durach for sending me these entries from Denver. (part 2/2)

Kaufmann, L., Carter, C.R., & Buhrmann, C. (2012). The Impact of Individual Debiasing Efforts on Financial Decision Effectiveness in the Supplier Selection Process. International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, 42 (5), 411-433 DOI: 10.1108/09600031211246492

Rossiter Hofer, A., Knemeyer, A.M., & Murphy, P.R. (2012). The Roles of Procedural and Distributive Justice in Logistics Outsourcing Relationships. Journal of Business Logistics, 33 (3), 196-209 DOI: 10.1111/j.2158-1592.2012.01052.x

Citations of Excellence Awards 2013

Some of you may remember my last year’s post about the 2012 Citations of Excellence Awards. A year has passed since and Emerald Management Reviews has now announced the winners of the 2013 Citation of Excellence Awards. I went through the list of 50 awarded papers and discovered two papers which I think are particularly relevant to our field. First, a paper by Lawson et al. (2009), Knowledge Sharing in Interorganizational Product Development Teams: The Effect of Formal and Informal Socialization Mechanisms, reveals that informal socialization mechanisms, including communication guidelines and social events, “play an important role in facilitating interorganizational knowledge sharing”. Second, a paper by Pagell and Wu (2009), Building a More Complete Theory of Sustainable Supply Chain Management Using Case Studies of 10 Exemplars, examines the supply chain as an entirety and builds “a coherent and testable model of the elements necessary to create a sustainable supply chain”. Congratulations to the winners of the awards.

Lawson, B., Petersen, K.J., Cousins, P.D., & Handfield, R.B. (2009). Knowledge Sharing in Interorganizational Product Development Teams: The Effect of Formal and Informal Socialization Mechanisms. Journal of Product Innovation Management, 26 (2), 156-172 DOI: 10.1111/j.1540-5885.2009.00343.x

Pagell, M., & Wu, Z. (2009). Building a More Complete Theory of Sustainable Supply Chain Management Using Case Studies of 10 Exemplars. Journal of Supply Chain Management, 45 (2), 37-56 DOI: 10.1111/j.1745-493X.2009.03162.x

Emerald Literati Network Awards for Excellence 2013

Every year, Emerald invites journal editors “to nominate what they believe has been that title’s Outstanding Paper and up to three Highly Commended Papers from the previous year”. These papers have now been announced as part of the Emerald Literati Network Awards for Excellence 2013. Papers by da Mota Pedrosa et al. on case study research, Olander and Norrman on contracts, Wieland and Wallenburg on supply chain risks, and Kaufmann et al. on debiasing efforts were nominated by IJPDLM. Papers by Kunz and Reiner, who conducted a meta-analysis, and Cozzolino et al., who conducted a case study, were nominated by JHLSCM. Papers by Seuring and Gold on content analysis, Walker and Jones on sustainable SCM, Ellinger et al. on SCM competency, and Oosterhuis et al. on goals were nominated by SCM:IJ. Papers from other journals can be found in the Outstanding Paper Awards list. Awarded papers are available on a free access until July 13th.

Laboratory Experiments in Supply Chain Research

Nobel laureates rarely publish articles in journals within the supply chain arena. Vernon L. Smith was awarded the 2002 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences “for having established laboratory experiments as a tool in empirical economic analysis, especially in the study of alternative market mechanisms”. In its recent issue, the Journal of Business Logistics had the great privilege to publish an article by Cary Deck and him, in which these ideas were applied to our field: Using Laboratory Experiments in Logistics and Supply Chain Research. It goes without saying that this article is certainly a must-read for SCM researchers, particularly, as the use of laboratory experiments has attracted some attention in our field. In their article, Deck and Smith highlight “several examples where experiments have been used to study issues relevant to logistics and supply chain management” and identify “several additional areas where laboratory experiments could be informative”.

Deck, C. & Smith, V. (2013). Using Laboratory Experiments in Logistics and Supply Chain Research. Journal of Business Logistics, 34 (1), 6-14 DOI: 10.1111/jbl.12006

Creating Added Value beyond Corporate Boundaries

Some months ago, Symrise, a global supplier of fragrances, flavors, active ingredients, and aroma chemicals, has won the German Sustainability Award 2012 in the “Germany’s Most Sustainable Initiatives” category for its approach to procure vanilla in Madagascar: Symrise closely collaborates with more than 1,000 vanilla farmers and “the entire procurement process takes place locally, from cultivation and harvesting, to the fermentation of the beans, all the way through to extraction”. The company partners with NGOs, development organizations, and farmers’ associations to ensure “that its projects in the areas of environmental protection, income diversification, nutrition, health and education continue to blossom over the long term”. Symrise benefits from these activities by receiving reliable access to top-quality raw materials. This initiative demonstrates how social responsibility, environmental protection, and business success can go hand in hand. It is also an example of good supply chain management, as added value is created beyond corporate boundaries.

Logistics and Supply Chain Management Dissertation Awards

Every year, various organizations recognize excellence in research with awards for outstanding dissertations. What follows is a selection of awards related to our field. The Science Award for Supply Chain Management (€10,000 honorarium for the winner) is awarded by the German Logistics Association (BVL). The Stinnes Foundation gives the DB Schenker Award (€10,000) to dissertations related to transportation and logistics. The CSCMP’s Doctoral Dissertation Award ($5,000) is for doctoral students “who demonstrate significant originality and technical competence”. The Hans Ovelgönne Award (€3,500) is awarded by the German Association for Materials Management, Purchasing and Logistics (BME) to dissertations related to procurement. Emerald and the EFMD sponsor the Outstanding Doctoral Research Awards (€1,000). The Elwood S. Buffa Doctoral Dissertation Award Competition ($1,500) recognizes the best dissertations written in the decision sciences. The Jungheinrich Foundation awards the Jungheinrich Award for the best dissertation (€1000). The IPSERA Doctoral Dissertation Award (€500) is given to the author of the best doctoral dissertation in the field of purchasing and supply management. Finally, the TSL Dissertation Prize ($500) is sponsored by the INFORMS Society on Transportation Science & Logistics. Good luck with your application.

Reflective and Formative Measurement Models

From time to time, I present insightful methodological articles on this blog. Today’s post is dedicated to an article by Edwards (2011): The fallacy of formative measurement (ORM, Vol. 14, No. 2). The article critically compares reflective and formative measurement, i.e., two optional directions of the relationship between constructs and measures in empirical research. Reflective measurement treats “constructs as causes of measures, such that measures are reflective manifestations of underlying constructs”, whereas formative measurement specifies “measures as causes of constructs, such that measures form or induce an underlying latent variable”. The article “compares reflective and formative measurement on the basis of dimensionality, internal consistency, identification, measurement error, construct validity, and causality”. It turns out that Edwards takes a negative stance towards formative measurement. Particularly, Edwards argues that “formative measurement is not a viable alternative to reflective measurement”. Edwards’s article was among the best paper winners of Organizational Research Methods in 2011.

Edwards, J.R. (2011). The Fallacy of Formative Measurement. Organizational Research Methods, 14 (2), 370-388 https://10.1177/1094428110378369

SCM Best Paper Award Winners 2012 (2/2)

Three more SCM-related journals have announced the winners of best paper awards. First, the Journal of Operations Management has awarded the Jack Meredith Best Paper Award to Speier and her co-authors for their article Global supply chain design considerations: Mitigating product safety and security risks. Second, the Journal of Supply Chain Management has chosen the winner of the 2011 Harold E. Fearon Best Paper Award. The winner is Information technology as an enabler of supply chain collaboration: A dynamic-capabilities perspective by Fawcett et al.; other finalists are Making sense of supply disruption risk research: A conceptual framework grounded in enactment theory by Ellis et al. and Managing buyer–supplier relationships: Empirical patterns of strategy formulation in industrial purchasing by Terpend et al. Third, the article Interorganizational system characteristics and supply chain integration: An empirical assessment by Saeed et al. was selected as the best paper published in the Decision Sciences Journal in 2010-2011. (part 1/2)

Speier, C. et al. (2011). Global supply chain design considerations: Mitigating product safety and security risks. Journal of Operations Management, 29 (7-8), 721-736 DOI: 10.1016/j.jom.2011.06.003

Fawcett, S. et al. (2011). Information technology as an enabler of supply chain collaboration: A dynamic-capabilities perspective. Journal of Supply Chain Management, 47 (1), 38-59 DOI: 10.1111/j.1745-493X.2010.03213.x

Saeed, K. et al. (2011). Interorganizational system characteristics and supply chain integration: An empirical assessment. Decision Sciences, 42 (1), 7-42 DOI: 10.1111/j.1540-5915.2010.00300.x