Archive by Author | Andreas Wieland

Aboard a Cargo Colossus

New York Times reports: “As companies look for more efficient ways to move freight from factories in China to consumers in Europe, the Mary is among the newest giants, known as the Triple-E’s. Owned and operated by A.P. Møller – Mærsk of Denmark, the world’s largest container shipping company, the Triple-E’s went into service last year, muscling their way into the $210 billion container industry.” Watch the video from the article.

Human Rights in the End-to-End Supply Chain

“Certification programs have their merits and their limitations. With the growing availability of social media, analytics tools, and supply chain data, a smarter set of solutions could soon be possible”, as Robert Handfield and I argue in our paper, just published in Supply Chain Management Review. We believe that an evolution from company thinking to supply chain thinking will now help to make businesses more socially responsible: “Traditional solutions that focus just on a brand (e.g., Company A) or the labels used with the brand (e.g., a label saying that Company A’s product is ‘fair’) are being supplemented by solutions that recognize a brand’s network (e.g., Company A’s upstream supply chain) and reveal how all entities of that network are treated (e.g., an interactive map of the supply chain on a smart device)”. This transformation requires costly data, but becomes realistic as transaction costs are increasingly reduced due to new technologies, standards, and algorithms.

Wieland, A., & Handfield, R.B. (2014). The Challenge of Ensuring Human Rights in the End-to-End Supply Chain. Supply Chain Management Review, 18 (6), 49-51

Impact Factors of Supply Chain Management Journals

Some weeks ago, Thomson Reuters published the impact factors of well-known management journals as part of their Journal Citation Reports. I looked up the impact factors of several supply chain management journals. At least two SCM-related journals have an impact factor larger than 3, indicating that they belong to the best in class in the management realm: Journal of Operations Management and Journal of Supply Chain Management. Moreover, two other journals have an impact factor close to 3: Supply Chain Management: An International Journal and Journal of Business Logistics. Four additional journals were able to reach an impact factor between 1.5 and 2: International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, Journal of Purchasing & Supply Management, Decision Sciences and International Journal of Operations & Production Management. Slightly smaller is the impact factor of the International Journal of Logistics Management. Finally, International Journal of Logistics: Research & Applications and Interfaces have impact factors smaller than 1. However, keep in mind that journal rankings have a downside and should not be the only criteria for judging the value of our research.

Supply Chain Process Modeling

Are you planning to integrate process modeling in your supply chain curricula? I am currently teaching a new course about supply chain process re-engineering at Copenhagen Business School. As part of a group work, the task of the students is to model processes between supply chain partners using the standard Business Process Model and Notation (BPMN). Initially, I thought about letting the students model the processes using PowerPoint or Visio, but then I realized that this isn’t the most appropriate way for such a group task. Then, I found a web-based process modeling platform that turns out to be ideal for my course. It is part of the BPM Academic Initiative of Signavio. I use the BPMN teaching packages in my course and offer my students the possibility of practical training with Signavio’s Process Editor. I have opened up a collaborative workspace and invited my students by sending an invitation link. No installation is required, it is free of charge.

Logistics is not Supply Chain Management, End of Story

There still seems to be much confusion about the terms “logistics” and “supply chain management”. Much like accounting, SCM takes a cross-functional perspective within an organization (this includes purchasing, R&D, marketing, sales, IT, and – logistics), but goes beyond the first and second tiers on both the supplier and customer sides. Therefore, supply chain managers are typically concerned with managing the relationships with channel partners. SCM relates to questions like: How can the bullwhip effect be avoided? How can production be ensured if a supplier’s supplier’s plant burns down? How can CO2 emissions of a product be measured, including the emissions of a supplier’s supplier’s plant, an LSP’s trucks, and disposal by consumers? What alternative types of governance are available to coordinate with a second-tier supplier or a retailer, if a direct contract with them is impossible (or you don’t even know who they are)? A logistics manager might ask some of these questions, too, but isn’t she mainly concerned with managing the flow and storage of goods and services?

Why Supply Chain Management Matters

Why Supply Chain Management Matters

New Editors for the Journal of Business Logistics (Guest Post by C.M. Wallenburg, WHU)

In my recent post, I wrote that the CSCMP’s Educators’ Conference is a forum to catch the latest news from our field. This year, among these news was the announcement of the new Editors-in-Chief for the Journal of Business Logistics. In this guest post, Carl Marcus Wallenburg, one of the European Editors of the journal, provides additional information.

At this year’s CSCMP’s Educators’ Conference the new incoming Editors-in-Chief of the Journal of Business Logistics (JBL) were announced. Starting January 2016, Walter Zinn and Thomas Goldsby, both Professors at The Ohio State University (OSU), will be in charge of this premier supply chain journal. Before that the two will work closely with the current editors Matthew Waller (University of Arkansas) and Stan Fawcett (Weber State University) to facilitate a smooth transition to the new editorial team. I will continue to support the journal and new editors in my function as European Editor. One cornerstone of our European activities is the European Research Seminar (ERS) which I co-chair together with Britta Gammelgaard from Copenhagen Business School, who also serves as European Editor. Next year’s ERS will be held in Copenhagen on April 23 and 24, 2015.

Carl Marcus Wallenburg is a chaired professor at WHU – Otto Beisheim School of Management, where he serves as Director of the Kühne-Institute for Logistics Management.

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