Archive by Author | Andreas Wieland

SCM Best Paper Award Winners 2014

This year, the CSCMP’s Annual Global Conference 2014 was held in San Antonio, Texas. The Educators’ Conference, which provides academics and students a forum to hear the latest in our research field, has become an integral part of it. As every year (see my previous post from Denver last year), several leading supply chain management journals have used this forum to present their best paper awards. And these are this year’s winners: Miller, Saldanha, Hunt & Mello (Bernard J. La Londe Best Paper Award, Journal of Business Logistics), Spillan, McGinnis, Kara & Yi (International Journal of Logistics Management), Winter & Knemeyer (International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management), Corsi, Grimm, Cantor & Wright (Transportation Journal), Nyaga, Lynch, Marshall & Ambrose (Harold E. Fearon Best Paper Award, Journal of Supply Chain Management), and Dixon & Verma (Journal of Operations Management). Congratulations to all the winners. You have made a great job!

Corsi, T.M., Grimm, C., Cantor, D., & Wright, D. (2014). Should Smaller Commercial Trucks Be Subject to Safety Regulations? Transportation Journal, 53 (2), 117-142 DOI: 10.5325/transportationj.53.2.0117

Dixon, M., & Verma, R. (2013). Sequence Effects in Service Bundles: Implications for Service Design and Scheduling. Journal of Operations Management, 31 (3), 138-152 DOI: 10.1016/j.jom.2012.12.002

Miller, J., Saldanha, J., Hunt, C., & Mello, J. (2013). Combining Formal Controls to Improve Firm Performance. Journal of Business Logistics, 34 (4), 301-318 DOI: 10.1111/jbl.12028

Nyaga, G., Lynch, D., Marshall, D., & Ambrose, E. (2013). Power Asymmetry, Adaptation and Collaboration in Dyadic Relationships Involving a Powerful Partner. Journal of Supply Chain Management, 49 (3), 42-65 DOI: 10.1111/jscm.12011

Spillan, J., McGinnis, M., Kara, A., & Yi, G. (2013). A Comparison of the Effect of Logistic Strategy and Logistics Integration on Firm Competitiveness in the USA and China. International Journal of Logistics Management, 24 (2), 153-179 DOI: 10.1108/IJLM-06-2012-0045

Winter, M., & Knemeyer, A. (2013). Exploring the Integration of Sustainability and Supply Chain Management: Current State and Opportunities for Future Inquiry. International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, 43 (1), 18-38 DOI: 10.1108/09600031311293237

Vanilla Sourcing in Madagascar

In a previous post, I demonstrated how Symrise creates added value beyond corporate boundaries by closely collaborating with vanilla farmers in Madagascar. Watch the following video, which highlights this approach from the perspective of Unilever, a buyer of Symrise’s aromatic compounds. The case is also included in an article I have written for Supply Chain Management Review about the interface between SCM and CSR.

Supply Chain Textbooks in German

If you speak German, today’s post might be particularly interesting for you. Once a year, the German Academic Association for Business Research (VHB), an internationally oriented association representing more than 2,100 mostly German-speaking members, awards its Textbook Award. The award aims to “[encourage] members of the association to expand their activities in the field of teaching” and to “highlight and acknowledge the importance of scientifically founded teaching in business research”. This year, the prize was awarded to a book related to SCM for the first time. It is concisely titled “Supply Chain Management” and was written by Michael Eßig, Erik Hofmann, and Wolfgang Stölzle. Another SCM book, a German translation of the 5th edition of Chopra and Meindl’s classic textbook, has been published this year. In a recent survey, the English version was selected as the most important academic SCM book. Not only will these two books help German-speaking SCM students to get in touch with our field, these textbooks will also help lecturers to prepare and teach their SCM modules.

Chopra, S. & Meindl, P. (2014). Supply Chain Management: Strategie, Planung und Umsetzung. 5. Aufl. ISBN 3868941886

Eßig, M., Hofmann, E. & Stölzle, W. (2013). Supply Chain Management. ISBN 3800634783

The Mechanisms of Supply Chain Resilience

Two ingredients are needed to create supply chain resilience (Wieland & Wallenburg, 2013): robustness, which is proactive, and agility, which is reactive. Robustness builds on anticipation “to gain knowledge about potential changes that might occur in the future” and preparedness “to maintain a stable situation”. Agility builds on visibility “to gain knowledge about actual changes that are currently occurring” and speed “to get back to a stable situation”.

Mechanisms of Resilience

Wieland, A., & Wallenburg, C.M. (2013). The Influence of Relational Competencies on Supply Chain Resilience: A Relational View. International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, 43 (4), 300-320 DOI: 10.1108/IJPDLM-08-2012-0243

Reducing Risk and Creating More Resilient Supply Chains

That does a supply chain risk researcher’s heart good: MIT Sloan Management Review has recently published two interesting case studies about the interface between risk and supply chain management. First, in the magazine’s spring issue, Chopra and Sodhi call attention to a dilemma faced by most managers: “Solutions to reduce risk mean little unless they are evaluated against their impact on cost efficiency”. To protect supply chains from disruptions anyway, the authors suggest two strategies: (1) segmenting the supply chain and (2) regionalizing the supply chain. Second, in the summer issue, Sáenz and Revilla present a five-step process started by Cisco shortly after a major risk event: (1) identify strategic priorities, (2) map the vulnerabilities of the supply chain design, (3) integrate risk awareness into the product and the value chain, (4) monitor resiliency, and (5) watch for events. Both articles complement each other very well and give a quick entry into the area of supply chain risk and resilience.

Chopra, S., & Sodhi, M.S. (2014). Reducing the Risk of Supply Chain Disruptions. MIT Sloan Management Review (spring 2014)

Sáenz, M.J., & Revilla, E. (2014). Creating More Resilient Supply Chains. MIT Sloan Management Review (summer 2014)

Academic Positions in Supply Chain Management

Are you considering an academic career in supply chain management? A premium resource, dedicated to academic positions in logistics, is the Academic Hiring Survey (pdf), provided by The Ohio State University. Akadeus offers an interesting collection of open positions in business schools worldwide. If you are looking for a position in North America, then the following webpages might be helpful: Decision Sciences Institute Placement Services and INFORMS Career Center (both pages contain some positions outside North America, too). In Germany, Austria, and Switzerland, the most important hub for academic positions at more senior levels is academics.com. Selected logistics/SCM-related positions can be found on the vacancies page of VHB’s WK Logistik (in German, but usually contains offers in English, too). A British webpage about academic employment is jobs.ac.uk; it is not restricted to positions in the UK. SCM positions are also announced on the Logprofs and Transci-Logistics-section mailing lists. Good luck with your application!

Rethinking Corporate Social Compliance in the Supply Chain

Managers are increasingly under pressure to ensure that their products bear attributes like “fair”, “ethical”, “green”, or “social”. Hereby, it becomes clear that solutions cannot just be found in the manager’s company, but in the company’s end-to-end supply chain. This has led companies to audit every company along their global supply chains against the own standards, which resulted in a large volume of auditing. The Rana Plaza building collapse, however, tragically showed that this top-down approach seems to fail. Departing from this observation, a new EY report, Human Rights and Professional Wrongs (pdf), provides an excellent summary of the problem and a set of recommendations for improvement. For example, the authors recommend to use third-party certifiers and auditors more strategically, to prevent orders from factories that have not had their status assessed, and to maintain longer relationships with a smaller number of suppliers. These recommendations could help to sharpen a blunt sword.

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