Archive by Author | Andreas Wieland

Supply Chain Process Modeling

Are you planning to integrate process modeling in your supply chain curricula? I am currently teaching a new course about supply chain process re-engineering at Copenhagen Business School. As part of a group work, the task of the students is to model processes between supply chain partners using the standard Business Process Model and Notation (BPMN). Initially, I thought about letting the students model the processes in PowerPoint or Visio, but then I realized that this isn’t the most appropriate way for such a group task. Then, I found a web-based process modeling platform that turns out to be ideal for my course. It is part of the BPM Academic Initiative of Signavio. I use the BPMN teaching packages in my course and offer my students the possibility of practical training with Signavio’s Process Editor. I have opened up a collaborative workspace and invited my students by sending an invitation link. No installation is required, it is free of charge.

Logistics is not Supply Chain Management, End of Story

There still seems to be much confusion about the terms “logistics” and “supply chain management”. Much like accounting, SCM takes a cross-functional perspective within an organization (this includes purchasing, R&D, marketing, sales, IT, and – logistics), but goes beyond the first and second tiers on both the supplier and customer sides. Therefore, supply chain managers are typically concerned with managing the relationships with channel partners. SCM relates to questions like: How can the bullwhip effect be avoided? How can production be ensured if a supplier’s supplier’s plant burns down? How can CO2 emissions of a product be measured, including the emissions of a supplier’s supplier’s plant, an LSP’s trucks, and disposal by consumers? What alternative types of governance are available to coordinate with a second-tier supplier or a retailer, if a direct contract with them is impossible (or you don’t even know who they are)? A logistics manager might ask some of these questions, too, but isn’t she mainly concerned with managing the flow and storage of goods and services?

Why Supply Chain Management Matters

Why Supply Chain Management Matters

New Editors for the Journal of Business Logistics (Guest Post by C.M. Wallenburg, WHU)

In my recent post, I wrote that the CSCMP’s Educators’ Conference is a forum to catch the latest news from our field. This year, among these news was the announcement of the new Editors-in-Chief for the Journal of Business Logistics. In this guest post, Carl Marcus Wallenburg, one of the European Editors of the journal, provides additional information.

At this year’s CSCMP’s Educators’ Conference the new incoming Editors-in-Chief of the Journal of Business Logistics (JBL) were announced. Starting January 2016, Walter Zinn and Thomas Goldsby, both Professors at The Ohio State University (OSU), will be in charge of this premier supply chain journal. Before that the two will work closely with the current editors Matthew Waller (University of Arkansas) and Stan Fawcett (Weber State University) to facilitate a smooth transition to the new editorial team. I will continue to support the journal and new editors in my function as European Editor. One cornerstone of our European activities is the European Research Seminar (ERS) which I co-chair together with Britta Gammelgaard from Copenhagen Business School, who also serves as European Editor. Next year’s ERS will be held in Copenhagen on April 23 and 24, 2015.

Carl Marcus Wallenburg is a chaired professor at WHU – Otto Beisheim School of Management, where he serves as Director of the Kühne-Institute for Logistics Management.

Measuring Scholarly Impact

“Everything has to be measurable!” seems to be the new academic doctrine. In the current issue of BizEd Magazine, Sharon Shinn delivers a detailed description of the problems associated with measuring scholarly impact. She concludes: “Tenure-track faculty continue to absorb responsibilities that take time away from conducting research, but the number of A-journal publications is still the primary metric that is considered in faculty evaluations. And that’s a problem still looking for an answer.” If A-journal publications are the primary metric, this could, for example, also prevent us from writing a good book (writing it can take several years!), even though it might be read all over the world. A key reason why people argue for exactly the kinds of rankings Shinn critiques is that they avoid the need for argument between competing factions with different views. Metrics are really useful in support of decisions. But the problems start when they are made.

SCM Best Paper Award Winners 2014

This year, the CSCMP’s Annual Global Conference 2014 was held in San Antonio, Texas. The Educators’ Conference, which provides academics and students a forum to hear the latest in our research field, has become an integral part of it. As every year (see my previous post from Denver last year), several leading supply chain management journals have used this forum to present their best paper awards. And these are this year’s winners: Miller, Saldanha, Hunt & Mello (Bernard J. La Londe Best Paper Award, Journal of Business Logistics), Spillan, McGinnis, Kara & Yi (International Journal of Logistics Management), Winter & Knemeyer (International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management), Corsi, Grimm, Cantor & Wright (Transportation Journal), Nyaga, Lynch, Marshall & Ambrose (Harold E. Fearon Best Paper Award, Journal of Supply Chain Management), and Dixon & Verma (Journal of Operations Management). Congratulations to all the winners. You have made a great job!

Corsi, T.M., Grimm, C., Cantor, D., & Wright, D. (2014). Should Smaller Commercial Trucks Be Subject to Safety Regulations? Transportation Journal, 53 (2), 117-142 DOI: 10.5325/transportationj.53.2.0117

Dixon, M., & Verma, R. (2013). Sequence Effects in Service Bundles: Implications for Service Design and Scheduling. Journal of Operations Management, 31 (3), 138-152 DOI: 10.1016/j.jom.2012.12.002

Miller, J., Saldanha, J., Hunt, C., & Mello, J. (2013). Combining Formal Controls to Improve Firm Performance. Journal of Business Logistics, 34 (4), 301-318 DOI: 10.1111/jbl.12028

Nyaga, G., Lynch, D., Marshall, D., & Ambrose, E. (2013). Power Asymmetry, Adaptation and Collaboration in Dyadic Relationships Involving a Powerful Partner. Journal of Supply Chain Management, 49 (3), 42-65 DOI: 10.1111/jscm.12011

Spillan, J., McGinnis, M., Kara, A., & Yi, G. (2013). A Comparison of the Effect of Logistic Strategy and Logistics Integration on Firm Competitiveness in the USA and China. International Journal of Logistics Management, 24 (2), 153-179 DOI: 10.1108/IJLM-06-2012-0045

Winter, M., & Knemeyer, A. (2013). Exploring the Integration of Sustainability and Supply Chain Management: Current State and Opportunities for Future Inquiry. International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, 43 (1), 18-38 DOI: 10.1108/09600031311293237

Vanilla Sourcing in Madagascar

In a previous post, I demonstrated how Symrise creates added value beyond corporate boundaries by closely collaborating with vanilla farmers in Madagascar. Watch the following video, which highlights this approach from the perspective of Unilever, a buyer of Symrise’s aromatic compounds. The case is also included in an article I have written for Supply Chain Management Review about the interface between SCM and CSR.

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